MEREDITH Strategy & Design

We design great places and spaces that enhance the experience of  work. 
Our purpose is to help companies and organizations of every scale
more effectively achieve their goals
and capture value from what they and their people do.

Jim at meredithstrategyanddesign dot com

(248) 238-8480

Some things of interest from other places this week

In a review of some of the things we've bookmarked this week are these trending items.

How Can We Measure What’s Most Meaningful?

GOOD magazine offers some thoughts on performance metrics for innovating organizations, suggesting that "stories are indicative of a capacity and behavior... It is this behavior that is valuable as much as the specific outcome of the innovation or project... the right behaviors lead to the most valuable outcomes."

What Really Kills Great Companies: Inertia

In his periodic column in the Wall Street Journal, Gary Hamel continues his look at the impacts of organizational inertia. "Like a fast-spinning gyroscope that can’t be easily unbalanced, successful organizations spin around the axis of unshakeable beliefs and well-rehearsed routines—and it typically takes a dramatic outside force to destabilize the self-reinforcing system of policies and practices."

GM and the UAW Share the Blame for Saturn's Demise

Sometimes, of course, more active agents of destruction are at work.

Design - Redefining a Profession

Tim Brown, of IDEO, has a new book out this week. Change by Design makes arguments about the role of design in business, something that the New york Times, in its review, calls "a messy, uncertain, often inconclusive process, albeit one that is more fun, and much more productive than tweaking cigarette packets"

TCHO

And somewhere along thtcho1-citrus-200e way I came across this, one of the more delightful examples of the role of design coursing through virtually every component of a business.

The story of a start up, TCHO says there are "Lots of ways to tell the story of the 1.0s. Let’s start with dreams. Dreams of a lifetime, or, more precisely, lifetimes: co-founders Timothy Childs’s and Karl Bittong’s, the dreams that drove them to quit the Shuttle program to make chocolate, or to devote 42 years building chocolate factories around the world."

A copy of one of their videos is over there in my sidebar, but it's much better on their site.

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